Racial Disparities in Washington, D.C. COVID-19 Vaccine Administration

Thurgood Marshall Institute Racial Disparities in Washington, D.C. COVID-19 Vaccine Administration By Dr. Kesha Moore TMI Senior Researcher Washington, D.C. has often been referred to as Chocolate City because of its historic high percentage of Black residents comprising a majority of the population. While the percent of Black D.C. residents has dropped in recent years to 45% and the White population has risen to 36%, the nation’s capital is experiencing a gross magnification of the racial disparities in COVID-19 deaths and vaccinations compared to the rest of the country. Although Black people comprise 45% of D.C.’s population, they make up 75%

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Racial Disparities in New York State’s Vaccine Distribution

Racial Disparities in New York State’s COVID-19 Vaccine Distribution By Dr. Kesha Moore In New York State, like much of the nation, Black and Latinx communities have the highest rates of death from COVID-19. Yet, their higher vulnerability of dying from COVID-19 has not afforded them priority access to the life-saving vaccine. The Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security recommends that the highest priority access be given to individuals with the greatest risks of severe illness and death and their caregivers. Giving priority access to those at the highest risks of severe illness and death from COVID-19 is ethically and pragmatically

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NAACP v. USPS: Important Facts About LDF’s Case Against the United States Postal Service and the 2020 Elections

On December 17 2021, LDF and Public Citizen announced a settlement in the historic case NAACP v. United States Postal Service. Filed in August 2020, it challenged USPS delivery delays and inadequate measures to ensure timely delivery of mail-in ballots for the November 2020 election. Our suit resulted in USPS implementing court-ordered “extraordinary measures” for the timely delivery of ballots. Today’s settlement ensures that it will undertake similar efforts to prioritize the delivery of ballots in future national elections. USPS Historical Context The United States Postal Service (USPS) handles half the world’s mail, keeping families and friends connected. It serves

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Joining Forces: Thurgood Marshall and John Lewis

Joining Forces: Thurgood Marshall and John Lewis By Janell Byrd-Chichester Former Director of the Thurgood Marshall Institute John Lewis’s death on July 17 marked a profound loss for the civil rights community. Congressman Lewis was the last living member of the “Big Six” civil rights leaders and, in describing the weight of his loss, many reflected on the power, legacy, and intricacies of the broader civil rights movement. Today, as we celebrate the anniversary of NAACP Legal Defense Fund (LDF) founder Thurgood Marshall’s swearing in as the first Black Supreme Court justice, I find myself reflecting upon the special relationship

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Online Voter Registration: Good for States, Good for Voters

Online Voter Registration: Good for States, Good for Voters  August 11, 2020 Availability of Online Voter Registration Has Grown Significantly Since its 2002 Inception In 49 states and the District of Columbia, citizens who are eligible to vote must register with the state before they can vote.1 Traditionally, voters were required to register by submitting paper forms by mail or in person at an election office—but in the last two decades, a growing number of states have allowed voters to register by submitting forms via the internet. Today, 38 states and the District of Columbia allow voters to register online.

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Structural Racism is a Public Health Crisis

Structural Racism is a Public Health Crisis May 27, 2020 Structural racism is a public health crisis. It is the underlying condition fueling disparities in COVID-19 outcomes. Our success at fighting the spread of COVID-19 and ensuring public health and safety is predicated on acknowledging and addressing the pre-existing condition of structural racism that enables this pandemic to flourish.   It’s no coincidence that Black Americans were recently found to be much more likely to die of the virus than white Americans, or that a recent study found infection rates were five times higher in majority-minority zip codes than in White neighborhoods.

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