Source: NPR

The Justice Department recently approved Georgia's voter verification law, which requires voters to prove they are U.S. citizens. Federal officials had blocked the law since 2008 but accepted the policy last month.

 
The department, along with many civil rights groups, had opposed the 2008 Georgia law, saying it disproportionally affected the elderly, the poor and minorities. So it was a surprise when federal officials dropped their opposition.
 
"What Georgia has done is essentially created a new barrier where none existed before," says Kristen Clarke with the NAACP Legal Defense Fund.
The department, along with many civil rights groups, had opposed the 2008 Georgia law, saying it disproportionally affected the elderly, the poor and minorities. So it was a surprise when federal officials dropped their opposition.
 
"What Georgia has done is essentially created a new barrier where none existed before," says Kristen Clarke with the NAACP Legal Defense Fund.
 
"What Georgia has done is essentially created a new barrier where none existed before," says Kristen Clarke with the NAACP Legal Defense Fund.The Justice Department recently approved Georgia's voter verification law, which requires voters to prove they are U.S. citizens. Federal officials had blocked the law since 2008 but accepted the policy last month.
 
The department, along with many civil rights groups, had opposed the 2008 Georgia law, saying it disproportionally affected the elderly, the poor and minorities. So it was a surprise when federal officials dropped their opposition.
 
"What Georgia has done is essentially created a new barrier where none existed before," says Kristen Clarke with the NAACP Legal Defense Fund.