NAACP Legal Defense Fund : Defend, Educate, Empower

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"The NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund is simply the best civil rights law firm in American history." -- President Obama

News Updates

  • Civil Rights Groups File Complaint Over New York's High Stakes Tests

    11/15/12

    Every year, New York City middle-schoolers subject themselves to a grueling academic ritual that could make or break their educational futures, or so they're told. The 2.5-hour multiple-choice Specialized High School Admissions Test (SHSAT) serves as the sole gateway to a suite of elite public schools -- particularly Bronx Science, Stuyvesant and Brooklyn Technical. The kids who make the cut tend to be disproportionately Asian and white; Latino and black students are vastly underrepresented.

  • Debo Discusses VRA with Rachel Maddow

    11/13/12

    Debo Adegbile, LDF's Acting President and Director-Counsel, discusses with Rachel Maddow the Supreme Court taking on whether to strike down the heart of the Voting Rights Act in the Shelby County, Alabama v. Holder case.

  • The Elite Eight, on the Federal Radar

    11/11/12

    The civil rights office of the federal Department of Education has rightly decided to investigate a complaint filed in September by civil rights groups over the admissions policies of eight highly competitive “specialized” high schools in New York City, among which are Stuyvesant, the Bronx High School of Science and Brooklyn Technical High School.

  • Supreme Court Will Decide Whether to Strike Down the Heart of Voting Rights Act

    11/09/12

    NAACP Legal Defense Fund Warns of Clear and Persisting Threats to Minority Voter Access and Equality

    (Washington, D.C.) – Today, the U.S. Supreme Court agreed to hear a case brought by Shelby County, Alabama that challenges the constitutionality of the heart of the Voting Rights Act. 

  • Three Strikes Made Fairer

    11/09/12

    California’s voters softened one of the nation’s most destructive and unfair sentencing policies this week when they approved a ballot initiative revising the infamous three-strikes law of 1994, which imposes a life sentence for any felony conviction — no matter how minor — if the defendant has two previous serious convictions.