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"The NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund is simply the best civil rights law firm in American history." -- President Obama

News Updates

  • More schools rethinking zero-tolerance discipline stand

    6/02/11

    Nearly two decades after a zero-tolerance culture took hold in American schools, a growing number of educators and elected leaders are scaling back discipline policies that led to lengthy suspensions and ousters for such mistakes as carrying toy guns or Advil.

  • In Shift, Justice Department is Hiring Lawyers With Civil Rights Backgrounds

    5/31/11

    WASHINGTON — Under the Obama administration, the Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division has reversed a pattern of systematically hiring conservative lawyers with little experience in civil rights, the practice that caused a scandal over politicization during the Bush administration.

  • Rights groups ask court to join prisoner-redistricting suit

    5/27/11

    NEW YORK, May 27 (Reuters) - Three civil-rights organizations have requested permission to join as defendants in a lawsuit brought by state senators and citizens who wish to block a law changing the way New York's prisoners are counted for census purposes.

  • Court ruling victory for African American firefighters

    5/25/11

    CHICAGO - It was a long time in coming and a major blow against discrimination in hiring practices here. The 7th US Court of Appeals ordered the Chicago Fire Department (CFD) to hire 111 African Americans who had passed a qualifying exam to become fire fighters in 1995, but then weren't considered after the qualifying criteria was changed.

  • Civil Rights Groups Call for Retroactive Application of Guidelines for Cocaine Sentencing

    5/25/11

    A group of seven prominent national civil rights organizations that includes The Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights sent a letter to the U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder urging him to support the retroactive application of a new set of sentencing guidelines that accompany the implementation of the Fair Sentencing Act (FSA), which reduced the discriminatory sentencing disparity between crack cocaine and powder cocaine offenses.