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"The NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund is simply the best civil rights law firm in American history." -- President Obama

News Updates

  • Commentary on 'Fisher': The importance of diversity within diversity

    10/11/12

    At yesterday’s oral argument, the Justices grappled with the University of Texas’s articulation of what I will call “diversity within diversity,” referring to the consideration of distinctive characteristics of individuals within underrepresented minority groups.

  • Supreme Court Hears Affirmative Action Challenges by Public College Applicants

    10/11/12

    The U.S. Supreme Court took up a case on whether race should be considered in college applications. Gwen Ifill talks to National Law Journal's Marcia Coyle who explains the arguments. Ray Suarez talks to NAACP's Debo Adegbile and the Century Foundation's Richard Kahlenberg about potential implications for public institutions.

  • Editorial: Keep schools' right to limited use of race

    10/11/12

    In a 2007 case, Chief Justice John Roberts famously wrote that "the way to stop discrimination on the basis of race is to stop discriminating on the basis of race."

  • Why diversity in higher education isn't optional

    10/10/12

    For many students, college is the first time that they have meaningful interactions with people of other races. Because many of our nation’s neighborhoods and schools remain segregated, not by law but in fact, the opportunities to learn from, work with, and live alongside people who are different are often limited in American life. For decades, the United States Supreme Court has helped to break down these barriers through landmark rulings that paved he way for the nation’s universities to pursue the twin goals of academic excellence and broad diversity.

  • Justices to re-examine use of race in college admissions

    10/10/12

    Heman Marion Sweatt and Abigail Noel Fisher both wanted to attend the University of Texas at Austin.

    Both claimed their race was a primary reason for their rejection. Both filed civil rights lawsuits, and the Supreme Court ultimately agreed to hear their separate appeals -- filed more than half a century apart.