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Harry Belafonte calls For a New, Fair Sentencing Hearing For Duane Buck

Tuesday, August 20, 2013

Harry Belafonte's Facebook Call to Action

Harry Belafonte, a renowned activist and musician, released a statement on his Facebook page calling for a new, fair sentencing hearing for LDF's client, Duane Buck. Mr. Buck was sentenced to death by a jury that was told that he was more likely to be dangerous because he is Black."

“I am proud to join the efforts of more than 100 civil rights leaders, elected officials, clergy, former prosecutors and judges, a former TX governor and others call for a NEW, FAIR sentencing for Duane Buck. Add your voice at Change.org,” Mr. Belafonte wrote.

At Mr. Buck’s capital sentencing hearing sixteen years ago, the prosecutor elicited testimony from a psychologist who said Mr. Buck posed a future danger to society because he’s Black. Based on this testimony, the prosecutor then urged the jury to issue a death sentence — which they did.

By this statement, Mr. Belafonte joins hundreds of signatories throughout Texas and the country who write: “The State of Texas cannot condone any form of racial discrimination in the courtroom. The use of race in sentencing poisons the legal process and breeds cynicism in the judiciary. No execution should be carried out until the courts have a meaningful opportunity to address the evidence of fundamental injustice in Mr. Buck’s case. A new, fair sentencing hearing for Mr. Buck is absolutely necessary to restore public confidence in the criminal justice system."

“We’re delighted that Harry Belafonte is among the many civil rights leaders, lawyers, activists, and elected officials who are calling for a  new, fair sentencing hearing trial for our client Duane Buck” said Sherrilyn Ifill, LDF’s President and Director-Counsel. “Mr. Buck's death sentence is the clear product of racial discrimination, of which there’s a long history in Texas’s capital punishment system.”