NAACP Legal Defense Fund : Defend, Educate, Empower

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"The NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund is simply the best civil rights law firm in American history." -- President Obama

News Updates

  • LDF Criminal Justice Project "Know Your Rights Academy" Coming Soon

    1/11/13

    The NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund (LDF) has developed a Know Your Rights Academy to address unlawful, stops, frisks, searches, and arrests by NYPD officers conducting vertical patrols and enforcing criminal trespass in NYCHA buildings. The Academy will train a cadre of Manhattan NYCHA residents in the fundamentals of organizing and facilitation of Know Your Rights workshops for NYCHA residents as it relates to their interactions with law enforcement.

  • Why Do Democrats Want More Police in Schools?

    1/11/13

    It’s no surprise that Wayne LaPierre and the NRA think that increasing the presence of armed police and security in schools will be good for our children.

  • A Missed Opportunity to Help Ex-offenders

    12/21/12

    Last week the D.C. Council failed to act on the Returning Citizens Anti-Discrimination Act of 2012, opting instead to adopt a much weaker approach to helping ex-offenders in the city find jobs. If enacted, the Returning Citizens Anti-Discrimination Act would have prohibited employers from inquiring into an applicant’s criminal history until after they make a provisional offer of employment.

  • Law Professor to Head LDF as High Court Could Curb Civil Rights Gains

    12/19/12

    The new president of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund takes over as the U.S. Supreme Court is considering two cases that could curb gains made by the group.

  • 'Black America's Law Firm' Looks To Big Cases With New Leadership

    12/18/12

    The NAACP Legal Defense Fund has been called the law firm for black America. Once run by Thurgood Marshall, the group played a major role in desegregating public schools and fighting restrictions at the ballot box.

    Now, the Legal Defense Fund is preparing for a new leader — just as the Supreme Court considers cases that could pare back on those gains.