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"The NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund is simply the best civil rights law firm in American history." -- President Obama

News Updates

  • Bronx DA No Longer Prosecuting Some Stop-And-Frisk Cases

    10/01/12

    The Bronx district attorney's office is no longer prosecuting people stopped and arrested for trespassing unless the arresting officer ensures the arrest is warranted.

    The DA's bureau chief for Arraignments, Jeannette Rucker, sent a letter to the NYPD saying arresting officers will now have to submit to an interview, as first reported by The New York Times.

  • A True Education

    10/01/12

    I've always believed that the sign of a truly educated person is exhibited by their ability to synthesize seemingly unrelated events and come up with a perceptive insight.

    Allow me to try and add one based on recent events in New York's education system.

    Read the full article on the Huffington Post.

  • Staking too much on one test

    10/01/12

    Picture this: You’ve worked hard all of your life. You have the grades and academic awards to prove it. You are recognized as one of the best students in your peer group. And you have the chance to apply for an educational opportunity that could change your life. But getting this opportunity requires that you take a test. No other factors matter.

    Yet it turns out that this test has never been shown to actually measure whether you are qualified for that big opportunity, and it certainly doesn’t take into account all the work you have done.

  • Elise Boddie on Affirmative Action Before the US Supreme Court

    9/30/12

    On September 30, Acting Director of Litigation at LDF Elise Boddie, discussed on MSNBC's "Up with Chris Hayes" the future of affirmative action and the Supreme Court in the upcoming Fisher v. University of Texas at Austin case.

  • Students Say Pricey Test Prep Gives Admissions Advantage

    9/28/12

    Mayor Michael Bloomberg said the city's eight specialized high schools are for the best and the brightest and he thinks the best way to find those students is the way it's been done for decades, using only the results of one 2.5-hour test.

    "I think that Stuyvesant and these other schools are as fair as fair can be," he said Wednesday. "There's nothing subjective about this. You pass the test with the higher score, you get into the school, no matter what your ethnicity, no matter what your economic background."