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"The NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund is simply the best civil rights law firm in American history." -- President Obama

News Updates

  • Sunday Dialogue: Using Race in Admissions

    10/06/12

    To the Editor:

    The Supreme Court will hear arguments this month in a case with the potential to end the use of race as a factor in college admissions (Fisher v. University of Texas at Austin). Conservatives are eager for a sweeping ruling accomplishing just that. But their zeal betrays longstanding conservative values about states’ rights and the role of the courts. And the country is not exactly clamoring for the change they seek.

  • It’s Not Me, It’s You

    10/06/12

    Mr. Aronson, an associate professor at New York University, has been a leader in investigating the effects of social forces on academic achievement. Along with the psychologist Claude Steele, he identified the phenomenon known as “stereotype threat.” Members of groups believed to be academically inferior — African-American and Latino students enrolled in college, or female students in math and science courses — score much lower on tests when reminded beforehand of their race or gender.

  • Rap-Quoting Judge Preps Housing Patrol Trial

    10/05/12

     MANHATTAN (CN) - A federal judge cited Jay-Z, noted rapper and legal philosopher, in a footnote to her order approving a lawsuit challenging New York City's practice of sending "vertical patrols" of police to search public housing residents.

    "In one of his most popular songs, the rapper Jay-Z - who grew up in NYCHA's Marcy Houses in the Bedford-Stuyvesant section of Brooklyn - showcased his knowledge of these Fourth Amendment rights," U.S. District Judge Shira Scheindlin wrote in a footnote of her recent order.

  • Claims of Stop and Frisk in City Buildings Go Forward

    10/05/12

    Southern District Judge Shira Scheindlin (See Profile) yesterday denied the city's request for summary judgment against nine individuals claiming unlawful stops, frisks and arrests by New York City Police in the city's housing authority buildings.

  • Loitering Rules in Projects Are Too Vague, Judge Says

    10/04/12

    A federal judge in Manhattan declared on Thursday that the rules against loitering in public housing complexes were unconstitutionally vague, and gave the police too much discretion about whom to arrest.

    The ruling by Judge Shira A. Scheindlin of Federal District Court in Manhattan allowed a lawsuit challenging police arrests for trespassing in housing projects to move closer to trial.